salsa de chile ancho.

Salsas are so easy to make, yet except for the occasional pico de gallo, I pretty much always purchase them. How about you?

A few years ago, my dad and I made a whole bunch of salsa during our epic canning/preserving weekend. I loved it, but my dad thought it left something to be desired. I’ve always been intrigued by the varieties of dried chiles you can find in those little plastic boxes at the grocery store, but they always seemed like they would be such a chore.

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Oh, how wrong I was! I bought anchos for a four-pepper chili recipe, and was pleasantly surprised at how simple they were to prepare. Although they are dried, they still maintain some flexibility and pliability, and although I softened them in some stock for that recipe, this salsa recipe has you toast them and then prepare them dried, and I promise it is a breeze! This salsa will take you less than 10 minutes start to finish, and it is so completely worth it.

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Anchos are the dried version of a poblano chile, and they have a deep, complex flavor that is often described as having a similar flavor to a spicy raisin. Sounds weird, I know. But trust me, you’ll love it. Removing the seeds allows for the finished salsa to be warm with a mellow heat that will appeal to a wide variety of palates.

I used some crushed tomatoes that I had hanging out in the fridge, but you could certainly swap in a fresh tomato or two (I would use plum/roma tomatoes). Where I live, fresh tomatoes are amazing for 3 months out of the year, other than that, I always turn to canned, as out of season fresh ones tend to be mealy and bland. Yuck.

Note that this recipe is flexible and adaptable, as salsas can be customized in pretty much any way your heart and stomach desire! Eat with chips, add to tacos/quesadillas/burrito bowls, or my favorite way, mixed in with homemade tortilla chips for chilaquiles, topped with a fried egg. Mmmm. I know what I’m having for brunch!

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salsa de chile ancho.
adapted from https://kathleeniscookinginmexico.wordpress.com. 

ingredients
4-5 dried ancho chiles
3/4 cup tomatoes (I used canned diced)
1/2 small white onion
4 garlic cloves
1/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano
pinch of sea salt
1/2-1 cup hot water

directions
Heat a skillet over medium heat. Add the ancho chiles, and toast for 30 seconds on each side. Make sure not to blacken them, as it will impart a very bitter flavor. Remove from heat, cut the stems off, and scrap out seeds. Keep the skillet on medium low heat.

In a blender, add the tomatoes, onion, garlic, ancho chiles, oregano and salt. Process in a blender. The mixture may “get stuck”, this is when you’ll add the water. Process for 10-15 seconds longer, making sure not to process the salsa too smooth/runny. You should be able to scoop it with a spoon without it running right off.

Add one teaspoon of oil to the skillet. Add the salsa and cook for 2-3 minutes, allowing the salsa to cook, lightly bubbling. Taste and add additional salt if desired.

Store in a small glass container for up to 10 days. Makes 1.5 cups.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible** 

meyer lemon poppyseed loaf.

I’ve been ALL about meyer lemons this winter. Normally quite expensive, I’ve been finding bags of them for $2 at Trader Joe’s. So affordable, that they’ve currently replaced regular lemons in my morning warm water and lemon juice routine! I’m sure that’ll stop once they fall back out of season, but I’ve been relishing their sweet, bright, charming flavor as much as I can. One way I’ve done that is use them in this spin on lemon poppyseed bread.

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If you’ve never had meyer lemons, well, you’re in for a real treat! They are a cross between regular lemons and mandarin, and have a lovely, bright yet sweet lemon flavor. If you cannot find them, you can certainly just use regular lemons, and maybe swap up some of the lemon zest and juice for orange. That would be divine!

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As with most quick breads, this is definitely better the next day. To store, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and then foil. Enjoy a slice with your coffee or tea!

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meyer lemon poppyseed loaf.
slightly adapted from NY Times Cooking. 

ingredients
1 cup coconut palm sugar
3 tablespoons zest; two-three meyer lemons
1/2 cup buttermilk (can sub in 2% yogurt)
3 tablespoons fresh meyer lemon juice
3 eggs
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 3/4 cup unbleached all purpose flour
1.5 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon poppyseed
2/3 cup grapeseed oil

directions
Heat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour an 8-inch loaf pan.

In a bowl, combine lemon zest and sugar and rub with your fingers until it looks like wet sand. Whisk in buttermilk, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, vanilla and eggs. In a separate bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Whisk dry ingredients into the batter, then whisk in oil and poppy seeds.

Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center emerges clean, about 45-1 hour, checking after 45 minutes. If top begins to brown too quickly, tent with foil. Let cool in pan until warm to the touch, then turn out onto a baking rack set over a rimmed baking sheet. Turn cake right side up, and let cool completely before slicing.

Best when served 1-2 days after making.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible** 

spicy tomato + kale soup.

Another day, another soup recipe! Are you sick of me yet? If not, hooray! I am most grateful. And I ask that you join me on today’s delicious journey. I’m mashing up some favorites: soup (specifically tomato soup) and kale. If you’ve been around my blog at all, you know that I love both of those things. See: here, here, here, and oh yes, here! for evidence.

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This soup is perfect for entertaining. It’s completely allergen free and dietary restriction friendly! Gluten free, meat free, seafood free, dairy free, nut free, the list goes on! Not to mention, it’s beyond good for you and nourishing.

I already had a meat-centered dish on my week’s menu, so I used vegetable stock and am using cannelloni beans instead of cream or half and half for a vegan-friendly soup. Because there is no dairy in this soup, it is a great candidate for making ahead and freezing. The kale is nice and sturdy, so it holds up quite well to freezing and reheating.

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Serve with some toast and topped with some extra crushed red pepper for an extra kick, and enjoy!

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spicy tomato + kale soup.
adapted from foodbabe.com

ingredients
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 medium onion, diced
4 medium carrots, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2-1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
36 ounces crushed tomatoes (I often puree canned whole tomatoes)
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 quart low-sodium vegetable stock
1 teaspoon each dried rosemary, basil, sage
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 14 ounce can of cannelloni beans, drained and rinsed
2 cups water
1 bunch fresh kale, rinsed and chopped

directions
Heat olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Saute onions, garlic and carrots for 5-7 minutes until they are softened, onions translucent and fragrant. Add sea salt, pepper, crushed red pepper and rosemary, basil, and sage, and stir to combine. Allow the spice to cook and ‘bloom’ (they will become quite fragrant as they cook) for an additional minute.

Add pureed tomatoes and vegetable stock. Allow the soup to come up to a rapid simmer, reduce heat and partially cover. Let cook for 20-25 minutes, and then add the rinsed cannelloni beans. Stir together and allow to continue to simmer for additional 15-20 minutes.

Puree with an immersion blender or in batches in stand blender. Add chopped kale and cook for 5-10 minutes until kale slightly softens. Taste, and add additional salt/pepper/crushed red pepper if desired.

Serves 6. Freezes well.

*Please use organic ingredients wherever possible*  

winter vegetable soup.

It feels funny to post a winter soup recipe on a weekend where the weather was a record breaking 63 degrees yesterday!

Still, I was making soup regardless of the weather, and in typical NY fashion, we’ll be back to mid-30’s tomorrow. It was fun while it lasted! But, now, it’s time for winter vegetable soup with mustard greens.

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I saw this soup in an issue of Real Simple, and I loved the idea of swapping kale for spicy mustard greens in soup. As evidenced by this blog, kale is a mainstay in my recipes, soups and in other dishes. It’s always a good idea to switch up your greens to ensure the best variety of vitamins, minerals and nutrients, and for a savory palate like mine, mustard greens are a perfect fit! They are bitter with a bite, and they go perfectly with flavors of this soup: silky sweet potatoes, smoky flavor from the paprika (make sure to use smoked not sweet or hot!), and the tomatoey broth. The freshness and bitter taste is so lovely.

This winter vegetable soup may not be the prettiest bowl on the block, but it’s vegan, gluten free, and paleo and allergen-friendly. Just in time for these last few weeks of winter. Enjoy!

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winter vegetable soup.
adapted from realsimple.com 

ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 large onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 medium carrots, peeled and diced
2 celery stalks, diced
1 sweet potato, peeled and diced
1 teaspoon sea salt
1.5 teaspoons smoked paprika
1/2 cracked black pepper
14.5 ounce can petite diced tomatoes
6 cups vegetable stock
1 large bunch mustard greens, stemmed and chopped
parmesan cheese, for serving

directions
Preheat a large soup pot over medium-high heat and heat a tablespoon of oil. Cook onion, garlic, and paprika in oil until tender, about 5 minutes. Add carrots, celery, sweet potato, salt, and pepper; cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add mustard greens, tomatoes, and chicken broth; simmer 25 minutes.

Serve topped with parmesan. Serves 4 as a main dish.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible** 

 

basic, perfect polenta.

I’ve been trying to get better at meal planning for the week, as I already make about 24 stops at Wegmans/Trader Joes/public market/natural foods store each week. It never fails, I inevitably forget an ingredient or pick up a quick meal. I always have the best intentions to do a weekly shop…

A few weeks ago, I picked up some hot turkey Italian sausage at a great price, but never had time to make it, so I promptly tossed it in the freezer. When I did said weekly meal prep, I decided to cook up that sausage with some marinara. I wasn’t in mood for pasta, so I decided to make the classic Italian side dish, polenta.

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Mm, polenta. Have you ever tried it? Polenta is not for weeknight cooking. Classic polenta is made from humble cornmeal, and it takes a while for the cornmeal grains to swell up and cook properly to become tender, yielding that creamy finished texture, not unlike grits.

Polenta is remarkably simple, in both technique and number of ingredients. I used homemade stock for mine, but if you use store bough stock, please try and buy low sodium, as you’ll want to adjust the salt you use. Most recipes have you add the cornmeal to boiling water, a la quinoa or pasta, but not here! I think that contributes to the risk of lumpy polenta; no thank you! We want smooth and creamy: starting both cold and lots and lots of whisking will alleviate that risk.

Leftovers can be cut into squares or triangles and fried crisp in a pan with some oil; you’ll see the leftover polenta will thicken up considerably.

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Serving this under sliced Italian sausage and marinara sauce was a hit, and a delightful change from pasta. This homey, cozy side dish is perfect for short January days.

basic, perfect polenta.
adapted from New York Times Cooking. 

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ingredients
4-5 cups vegetable stock or water
1 cup coarsely ground cornmeal
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon sea salt, more to taste
1/2 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1/2 cup parmesan cheese plus 1 tablespoon (I have used an Italian cheese blend with mozzarella, fontina, romano with success).

directions
In a deep saucepan or saucier (2-3 quart), combine the stock, cornmeal, olive oil, salt and pepper over medium high heat. Whisk often (consistently, if not constantly), until the mixture comes to a boil.

Once boiling, reduce heat to low and simmer, whisking often, until mixture starts to thicken, about 5 minutes. Polenta mixture should still be slightly loose. Partially cover and cook for at least 45 minutes, whisking every 5 minutes or so. When polenta becomes too thick to whisk, stir with a wooden spoon, adding the additional cup of stock if needed (I always add 5 cups in total). Polenta is done when it pulls away from the side of the pot, and individual grains are tender and creamy.

Turn off heat and gently mix 1/2 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese into polenta until cheese has melted. Cover and let stand 5 minutes to thicken; stir and taste for salt before transferring to a serving bowl. Top polenta with about 1 tablespoon freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese for garnish.

Serves 4-6.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible** 

oatmeal + coconut breakfast muffins.

Hello there! As I’ve mentioned a few times, I am not a sweets person. That’s partly due to the fact that I have a very savory palate, but I think it’s also because I’m not really a baker. Savory recipes? Love. Cooking savory dishes tends to be more forgiving and they allow me to be more creative and ‘of the moment’, while baking requires more precision and attention to detail. Due to the exact nature of baking, I always shied away, until someone told me, “if you can do chemistry, you can bake, and vice versa”. Well, I loved chemistry in college, so I had to be able to translate into my kitchen! With recipes like the one I have today, it’s incredibly simple and the hardest thing about baking is learning how to measure properly!

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I love breakfast food. Especially breakfast pastries. Donuts, croissants, crepes, all are very, very good. I do think a well made muffin might be my favorite. They are basically sweetened, denser bread, all in its own cute little package! Divine. However, they are basically a caloric nightmare, with some bakery style muffins topping 500 calories. That’s insanity. Also totally unnecessary!

These oatmeal coconut muffins are absolutely delicious and unlike many bakery-style muffins, they will keep you full for longer than an hour! Oats are full of good for you fiber and complex carbohydrates, which take longer to digest, saving you from the dreaded blood sugar crash!

The flavor of the coconut really comes through thanks for the oil and the flaked coconut. Make sure to lightly soak the coconut in some milk. I used coconut milk, but any nut or regular dairy milk is fine as well. These are great for a quick breakfast on the go along with some fresh fruit, and you’ll be full until lunchtime!

oatmeal + coconut breakfast muffins. 

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ingredients
2 eggs
1/3 cup honey or agave
3/4 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup unrefined coconut oil
3/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup unbleached flour
2.5 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup unsweetened coconut, plus 1/4 cup reserved
A few tablespoons of coconut milk
2 cups rolled oats

directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add flaked coconut to a one cup measuring cup, and then add a few tablespoons of milk (coconut or regular) to the cup. Set aside while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

In the bowl of a mixer with the whisk attached, combine the eggs, honey, buttermilk , vanilla and oil and whisk on medium until well combined. If the coconut oil is at room temperature, you may have a few lumps of solid oil.

In a large bowl combine the flour, baking powder, soda and salt. With the mixer on low, add the dry ingredients until just combined. Add in oats and coconut (make sure to strain off the extra liquid) and mix well to combine.

Add to a greased muffin tin, filling 3/4 of each cup. Top with additional flaked coconut and bake for 17-19 minutes, inserting a toothpick to check for doneness.

Notes: These are delicious on their own, but feel free to add chocolate chips, dried cranberries, walnuts… the option are endless!

Makes 12 muffins.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible**

southern ham, greens + black eyed pea soup.

Hi there! I hope you’ve been enjoying the holiday season, and your Christmas and Hanukkah were (and are!) filled with joy, celebrations, relaxation, and of course, delicious food!

My dad and I cook Christmas dinner for our family, and this year we cooked a whole beef tenderloin, a grilled whole salmon, and I was responsible for everyone’s favorite hasselback potato gratin (probably everyone’s ‘favorite’, because it’s positively laden with cream and cheese, and I only make it once a year because it’s so unhealthy but OH-SO good. I use Kenji Lopez-Alt’s recipe, which can be found here). I also made these beans, which are simple and delicious. Everything was lovely and delicious, and I ate way too much. As you do for the holidays.

Speaking of holidays… let’s usher in the first holiday of 2017 with this soup.

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This recipe is one that I came up with a few years ago, when I was flipping through a cooking magazine and stopped on a warm ham, black eyed pea, and barley salad. I morphed that salad into a soup, surprised my boyfriend who loved black eyed peas with it, and it quickly became a favorite. Legend has it in the South that eating black eyed peas on New Years will bring you prosperity in the following year. So it’s the perfect time to bring you this recipe.

Starting this recipe by frying up a few pieces of bacon imparts a nice smokiness that will carry over to the finished soup. Because we’re using bacon and ham, go light on the salt and only use if needed; tasting often as you cook and develop the flavors. The collard greens and barley will cook for almost an hour, allowing the soup to develop a deep, complex flavor. At the very end, we’re going to add in a splash of hot sauce and cider vinegar, which adds a delectable bit of kick that finishes the soup beautifully.

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As it’s traditional in the Southern US to eat black eyed peas on New Year’s Day, they’re traditionally made with fat back ham, bacon, ham hocks, or other smoky pork. They’re typically eaten with some type of slow cooked green, like collards, turnip or mustard greens. A lot of preparation goes into those dishes; so I love that this soup incorporates all those elements into a one pot dish.

I hope 2017 is a healthy and limitless one for you and all of your loved ones!

southern ham + black eyed pea soup. 

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ingredients
1 medium onion, large dice
5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 cans black eyed peas, rinsed/drained
1/2 bunch collard greens, thinly sliced
6 cups low sodium chicken broth (up to 2 additional cups to thin out, if needed)
2 pieces bacon, diced
2 cup diced ham
2 carrots, chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 cup pearl barley, rinsed
2 tsp. dried oregano
1 tsp. cider vinegar
Tabasco
salt and pepper to taste

directions
Cook bacon in large pot until browned. Remove and drain. Dice onion, carrot and celery into a large dice. In large pot that bacon was cooked in, saute garlic, onion, carrot and celery in bacon drippings over moderate heat until onion is translucent.

While onion mixture is cooking, discard stems and ribs from collards and finely chop leaves. Set aside.

Add broth, oregano and barley to the onion mixture, add bacon. Bring to boil; reduce heat to medium/medium low and let simmer uncovered for 40 minutes. Add collard greens and chopped ham and let the whole mixture for about 20-25 minutes longer, until collards and barley are tender.

Mash half of the black eyed peas with a fork, and add the beans to the soup. Simmer 10 minutes longer, add pepper, salt, Tabasco and cider vinegar to taste. (Because the ham and bacon are salty, additional salt may not be needed). Serves 6.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible**