roasted red pepper + tomato soup with gouda.

A long time ago, I wrote about this delicious soup that was served at one of the hospital cafes. It was rich and delicious, and I always looked forward to the day they served it (Wednesdays). <– Is it kind of sad that I knew the soup schedule? While I used that soup as inspiration for a vegan version, today’s version is decidedly more indulgent. I suppose that happens when you add nearly one cup of smoked gouda cheese into the soup pot. Mmmmmm.

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The weather here in NY has taken a firmly fall turn over the past week, and I am not complaining. The brisk air just begs for soup, scarves, chunky sweaters and evenings curled up under blankets. Leslie heaven, you may say!

This soup is great for a weeknight, as we are using jarred fire roasted bell peppers (you know how I love them! Evidenced here, here, and here), canned crushed tomatoes, and jarred spices. Add a few pantry and refrigerator essentials, and in less than 45 minutes, soup is ready! So easy. I served this with a simple black kale salad, but you can serve with bread or croutons. Go on, it’s worth it.

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roasted red pepper + tomato soup with gouda.
inspired by my favorite roasted red pepper gouda bisque. 

ingredients
1 tablespoon grapeseed oil 
12 ounce jar of roasted red peppers, chopped, oil reserved 
28 ounce can crushed tomatoes
1 carrot, peeled and diced
1 medium onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, smashed and minced
3 cups vegetable or low sodium chicken stock
1 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
3/4-1 cup shredded gouda cheese

directions
Over medium heat, heat the grapeseed oil plus 1 tablespoon of the oil from the jarred peppers. Add the onion, carrot and garlic and let cook, 3-4 minutes, stirring frequently, or until the carrots have softened and the onions are translucent but not golden brown. Add the salt, pepper, basil, thyme, chopped peppers, tomatoes and vegetable broth and stir together to combine.

Increase heat to medium-high and bring to a rapid simmer/boil. Once boiling, reduce heat to low and partially cover, allowing soup to simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Turn off the heat. Blend soup smooth using an immersion blender, or using a stand blender. *If using a stand blender, allow soup to cool for 5 minutes, puree in batches, and always cover the lid with a kitchen towel to protect yourself from potential hot splatter. Add the pureed soup back into the soup pot*

Once pureed, heat the soup over medium-low heat and add in the gouda. Stir frequently for 10 minutes, or until cheese is completely melted and fully incorporated (you may need to increase the heat to allow the cheese to fully melt).

Ladle into bowls and serve. Serves 4 as an entree, 6 as a starter.

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five ingredient vegan tomato soup.

Do you ever want soup that tastes like it’s been simmering away in the pot all afternoon, but you’re too tired to even think about preparing dinner? Today’s recipe is just what you need! Five ingredients (plus oil/salt/pepper), a half an hour, and minimal prep will yield a comforting bowl of vegan tomato  soup. *raises hand*.

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The title of this recipe assumes you have oil/salt/pepper as “freebies” in your ingredients list. These are pantry staples, and when choosing an oil, I recommend non-inflammatory oils such as grapeseed, coconut, avocado (<— all great for medium/high heat cooking), as well as olive and sesame oils, which are lovely for lower heat and for garnishing.

If you have those on hand, the following soup needs only vegetable stock, canned tomatoes (try and grab at least one can of fire roasted ones!), garlic, onion, and a carrot and we have a soup that will be on the table in 30 minutes, and tastes surprisingly complex for the simple ingredients. I have a few other tomato soup recipes on this site (see here for a version using fresh tomatoes, and here for a creamy version), but this one utilizes only a few pantry essentials and is vegan friendly! Love that.

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Many tomato soup recipes call for sugar to offset the acidity of the canned tomatoes, but I use the same technique here as I do for my red sauce: carrots. Carrots are naturally sweet, and either dice them small or shred them and cook them with the onions and garlic. The carrots will start to caramelize and offer a natural sweetness which will neutralize the tomatoes’ acidity.

Serve with a slice of toast or a simple green salad. Make a double batch – it freezes beautifully!

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five ingredient vegan tomato soup.

ingredients
28 ounce can whole tomatoes, hand crushed with their juices
14 ounce can diced fire roasted diced tomatoes
1/2 onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 large carrot, peeled and diced or shredded
3 cups vegetable stock
2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
sea salt and black pepper (about 1/2 teaspoon each)
basil or parmesan cheese, to garnish (optional)

directions
Heat two tablespoons oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat. Add diced onion, diced/shredded carrot, and garlic and saute over heat for 4-5 minutes, stirring frequently.  Allow vegetables to cook until they soften and become translucent. Adjust heat lower if the vegetables begin to darken.

Add the 1/2 teaspoon sea salt and pepper, cans of crushed and diced tomatoes and 3 cups vegetable stock. Increase heat to a boil and then reduce to a simmer, and partially cover. Allow the soup to simmer for 20-25 minutes longer, and then turn off heat.

Remove 3 cup of soup to blender, blend and then return to the soup pot. Alternatively, use a stick blender to puree about 1/4-1/3 of the soup. Stir together and add additional salt or pepper if needed.

Split amongst four bowls and garnish with parmesan or basil if desired.

Serves 4.

*Use organic ingredients wherever possible* 

 

Moroccan red lentil soup.

Hello lovelies! I’m back, after an unexpected hiatus. It’s been a whirlwind the past four weeks, fueled by scattered and sporadic eating, late nights, and so. much. homework. Graduate school is no joke!

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Is it summer where you are? It’s Memorial Day weekend, and here I am, your trusty soup-fiend, bringing you another delicious and absolutely, positively, insanely healthful vegan recipe. Because here in NY, it’s been rainy, windy, and chilly. I’m not complaining, summer can hold off for as long as it wants. The chilled Spring we’ve been having has been just splendid. Among other reason, grey rainy skies equal soup. Lentil soup to be precise. Pulses such as lentils are no strangers around here, but making the same recipes over and over can get a little (a lot) boring. Did you know that lentils are nutritional powerhouses? Full of antioxidants and protein and iron, all packed in that tiny little package. Today we’re going to infuse this soup with tons of flavorful spices that are going to create a warming, intoxicating soup.

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This soup is intoxicating thanks to the spices we’re going to use: cumin, coriander, smoked paprika, turmeric, cinnamon. If you want to really take this over the edge, top with a squeeze of lemon, garnished with parsley and cilantro. I skipped the herbs for these photos, but trust me, they add an amazing fresh, herbaceous flavor. Give your lentils a new spin!

Moroccan red lentil soup. 

ingredients
1 cup split red lentils
4 cups vegetable stock + 1.5-2 cups water
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 tablespoon coconut/grapeseed oil
1 small onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon peeled fresh ginger, minced
1 heaping teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
3/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
3/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
pinch (1/8 teaspoon) cinnamon
3/4-1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
28 ounce can crushed or petite diced tomatoes with juices

optional to garnish:
fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1/2 cup parsley, chopped

directions

Heat oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions, garlic, ginger and carrots and saute for five minutes or until softened and translucent; stirring frequently to prevent browning. Add cumin, coriander, paprika, turmeric, cinnamon, salt and pepper, stirring to allow to spices to “bloom” or become fragrant for an additional 1-2 minutes.

Add red lentils, 4 cups vegetable stock, 1 cup water, and tomatoes. Increase heat and allow the soup to come to a boil. Once boiling, reduce to simmer, partially cover and allow to cook for 15-20 minutes until lentils have softened but have not broken down. If too thick, add additional 1/2-1 cup water. Taste and add additional salt or pepper if desired.

Ladle into bowls and top with herbs and lemon before serving. Makes 6 servings.

*Please use organic ingredients where possible* 

easy weeknight posole.

Hi there! It appears that spring has finally sprung here in NY, and this weekend was a mixture of rain and sun, with temperatures climbing towards the upper 60s. Crazy!

Due to this spring weather, I should probably be showing you a super fresh, veggie heavy salad. Next time. 🙂 Instead, I’m going to show you a recipe that will repurpose leftover pulled pork into a whole new dish. You see, a few weekends ago I cooked up a pork shoulder and being only one person in the house, a pork shoulder always yields way more than I need! Naturally you can throw it in tortillas, top pizza, make burrito bowls, slather it with your favorite sauce, but I was wanting something decidedly different with the leftovers. Enter posole! A classic Mexican dish, made with cumin, chiles, tomato and hominy, and of course, some of that leftover pork stashed away in the freezer.

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Traditional recipes call for making a salsa/puree from dried chiles, and cooking that together with the raw pork, slowly over a low temperature. Absolutely delicious, but very time consuming. This recipe, adapted from Martha Stewart, takes less than 30 minutes to come together, as we’re using tomato paste and chile powder in lieu of the dried chiles, and already cooked meat. I also threw in a can of fire roasted diced tomatoes for some extra body, but you can leave them out if you so desire. Easy enough to be whipped together any weeknight evening, and tastes like you’ve been slaving away all day. Love that.

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Posole can be red or green (dependent upon chile type), and is typically very simple: pork and hominy. The garnishes really take it over the top. I garnished this simply with sliced radishes, some cilantro and a squeeze of lime. You can top with thinly sliced corn tortillas, sliced avocado, etc. The options are endless.

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easy weeknight red posole.
adapted from Martha Stewart, One Pot. 

ingredients
1.5-2 cups shredded pork (or chicken or beef), already cooked
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, diced
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons chile powder
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)
2 cups water
4 cups low-sodium chicken stock
1 14 ounce can of hominy, drained and rinsed
1 14 ounce fire-roasted crushed tomatoes
1 lime, cut into wedges for garnish
1/3 cup cilantro leaves chopped, for garnish
corn tortillas, cut into strips, for garnish

directions

Heat a soup pot over medium heat, add the oil and heat. Add the onion and garlic and let saute, 3-5 minutes, until translucent and soft. Add the chile power, stirring often, for an additional 2 minutes, being careful not to burn. Add cumin, salt, tomato paste and water, and stir to combine. Stir often and allow the mixture to come up to a simmer, thicken, and combine (this is basically an enchilada sauce!). The simmering/thickening process should take about 10 minutes.

Add the 4 cups chicken stock, cooked pork, drained hominy, and diced tomatoes. Bring mixture to boil, reduce to a simmer, and let the soup gently simmer for 20 minutes, or as long as you’d like. Ladle into bowls, and top with thinly sliced radishes, chopped cilantro, and a squeeze of lime.

Serves 4-6.

*Please use organic ingredients wherever possible* 

spicy tomato + kale soup.

Another day, another soup recipe! Are you sick of me yet? If not, hooray! I am most grateful. And I ask that you join me on today’s delicious journey. I’m mashing up some favorites: soup (specifically tomato soup) and kale. If you’ve been around my blog at all, you know that I love both of those things. See: here, here, here, and oh yes, here! for evidence.

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This soup is perfect for entertaining. It’s completely allergen free and dietary restriction friendly! Gluten free, meat free, seafood free, dairy free, nut free, the list goes on! Not to mention, it’s beyond good for you and nourishing.

I already had a meat-centered dish on my week’s menu, so I used vegetable stock and am using cannelloni beans instead of cream or half and half for a vegan-friendly soup. Because there is no dairy in this soup, it is a great candidate for making ahead and freezing. The kale is nice and sturdy, so it holds up quite well to freezing and reheating.

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Serve with some toast and topped with some extra crushed red pepper for an extra kick, and enjoy!

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spicy tomato + kale soup.
adapted from foodbabe.com

ingredients
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 medium onion, diced
4 medium carrots, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2-1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
36 ounces crushed tomatoes (I often puree canned whole tomatoes)
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 quart low-sodium vegetable stock
1 teaspoon each dried rosemary, basil, sage
1 bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 14 ounce can of cannelloni beans, drained and rinsed
2 cups water
1 bunch fresh kale, rinsed and chopped

directions
Heat olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Saute onions, garlic and carrots for 5-7 minutes until they are softened, onions translucent and fragrant. Add sea salt, pepper, crushed red pepper and rosemary, basil, and sage, and stir to combine. Allow the spice to cook and ‘bloom’ (they will become quite fragrant as they cook) for an additional minute.

Add pureed tomatoes and vegetable stock. Allow the soup to come up to a rapid simmer, reduce heat and partially cover. Let cook for 20-25 minutes, and then add the rinsed cannelloni beans. Stir together and allow to continue to simmer for additional 15-20 minutes.

Puree with an immersion blender or in batches in stand blender. Add chopped kale and cook for 5-10 minutes until kale slightly softens. Taste, and add additional salt/pepper/crushed red pepper if desired.

Serves 6. Freezes well.

*Please use organic ingredients wherever possible*  

winter vegetable soup.

It feels funny to post a winter soup recipe on a weekend where the weather was a record breaking 63 degrees yesterday!

Still, I was making soup regardless of the weather, and in typical NY fashion, we’ll be back to mid-30’s tomorrow. It was fun while it lasted! But, now, it’s time for winter vegetable soup with mustard greens.

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I saw this soup in an issue of Real Simple, and I loved the idea of swapping kale for spicy mustard greens in soup. As evidenced by this blog, kale is a mainstay in my recipes, soups and in other dishes. It’s always a good idea to switch up your greens to ensure the best variety of vitamins, minerals and nutrients, and for a savory palate like mine, mustard greens are a perfect fit! They are bitter with a bite, and they go perfectly with flavors of this soup: silky sweet potatoes, smoky flavor from the paprika (make sure to use smoked not sweet or hot!), and the tomatoey broth. The freshness and bitter taste is so lovely.

This winter vegetable soup may not be the prettiest bowl on the block, but it’s vegan, gluten free, and paleo and allergen-friendly. Just in time for these last few weeks of winter. Enjoy!

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winter vegetable soup.
adapted from realsimple.com 

ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 large onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 medium carrots, peeled and diced
2 celery stalks, diced
1 sweet potato, peeled and diced
1 teaspoon sea salt
1.5 teaspoons smoked paprika
1/2 cracked black pepper
14.5 ounce can petite diced tomatoes
6 cups vegetable stock
1 large bunch mustard greens, stemmed and chopped
parmesan cheese, for serving

directions
Preheat a large soup pot over medium-high heat and heat a tablespoon of oil. Cook onion, garlic, and paprika in oil until tender, about 5 minutes. Add carrots, celery, sweet potato, salt, and pepper; cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add mustard greens, tomatoes, and chicken broth; simmer 25 minutes.

Serve topped with parmesan. Serves 4 as a main dish.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible** 

 

southern ham, greens + black eyed pea soup.

Hi there! I hope you’ve been enjoying the holiday season, and your Christmas and Hanukkah were (and are!) filled with joy, celebrations, relaxation, and of course, delicious food!

My dad and I cook Christmas dinner for our family, and this year we cooked a whole beef tenderloin, a grilled whole salmon, and I was responsible for everyone’s favorite hasselback potato gratin (probably everyone’s ‘favorite’, because it’s positively laden with cream and cheese, and I only make it once a year because it’s so unhealthy but OH-SO good. I use Kenji Lopez-Alt’s recipe, which can be found here). I also made these beans, which are simple and delicious. Everything was lovely and delicious, and I ate way too much. As you do for the holidays.

Speaking of holidays… let’s usher in the first holiday of 2017 with this soup.

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This recipe is one that I came up with a few years ago, when I was flipping through a cooking magazine and stopped on a warm ham, black eyed pea, and barley salad. I morphed that salad into a soup, surprised my boyfriend who loved black eyed peas with it, and it quickly became a favorite. Legend has it in the South that eating black eyed peas on New Years will bring you prosperity in the following year. So it’s the perfect time to bring you this recipe.

Starting this recipe by frying up a few pieces of bacon imparts a nice smokiness that will carry over to the finished soup. Because we’re using bacon and ham, go light on the salt and only use if needed; tasting often as you cook and develop the flavors. The collard greens and barley will cook for almost an hour, allowing the soup to develop a deep, complex flavor. At the very end, we’re going to add in a splash of hot sauce and cider vinegar, which adds a delectable bit of kick that finishes the soup beautifully.

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As it’s traditional in the Southern US to eat black eyed peas on New Year’s Day, they’re traditionally made with fat back ham, bacon, ham hocks, or other smoky pork. They’re typically eaten with some type of slow cooked green, like collards, turnip or mustard greens. A lot of preparation goes into those dishes; so I love that this soup incorporates all those elements into a one pot dish.

I hope 2017 is a healthy and limitless one for you and all of your loved ones!

southern ham + black eyed pea soup. 

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ingredients
1 medium onion, large dice
5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 cans black eyed peas, rinsed/drained
1/2 bunch collard greens, thinly sliced
6 cups low sodium chicken broth (up to 2 additional cups to thin out, if needed)
2 pieces bacon, diced
2 cup diced ham
2 carrots, chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 cup pearl barley, rinsed
2 tsp. dried oregano
1 tsp. cider vinegar
Tabasco
salt and pepper to taste

directions
Cook bacon in large pot until browned. Remove and drain. Dice onion, carrot and celery into a large dice. In large pot that bacon was cooked in, saute garlic, onion, carrot and celery in bacon drippings over moderate heat until onion is translucent.

While onion mixture is cooking, discard stems and ribs from collards and finely chop leaves. Set aside.

Add broth, oregano and barley to the onion mixture, add bacon. Bring to boil; reduce heat to medium/medium low and let simmer uncovered for 40 minutes. Add collard greens and chopped ham and let the whole mixture for about 20-25 minutes longer, until collards and barley are tender.

Mash half of the black eyed peas with a fork, and add the beans to the soup. Simmer 10 minutes longer, add pepper, salt, Tabasco and cider vinegar to taste. (Because the ham and bacon are salty, additional salt may not be needed). Serves 6.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible** 

quick + easy creamy tomato soup.

As mentioned a plethora of times, I love soup. It’s especially enchanting during these fall and winter months, when the daylight is fleeting, the wind is whipping, and you’re shivering just going from your car to your front door. Soup is the answer. So is vodka, but that’s a story for another time.

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Growing up, I never ate creamy soups. We ate broth based soups, and although a variety of tomato soups were always on the menu, I didn’t have cream of tomato until I was at least 20. I remember seeing it on a menu at a fast casual restaurant, and being wary to order it. I remember thinking “will I like it? I don’t like milk or cream”. I did.

I had a hankering for soup recently, and I had some leftover half and half from a different recipe so I decided to make creamy tomato soup. Let me tell you, I used canned and jarred tomatoes to make this a quick recipe, and I’ve found my new obsession: passata.

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Pictured above, passata is essentially a puree of uncooked tomatoes, and I describe in more detail at the end of this post, including substitutions if you can’t find it.

This soup hit the spot for me, and because I used half and half in place of the cream (only 2/3 cup!), you can feel good about eating a great big bowl! Also? A grilled cheese accompaniment is not mandatory, but highly recommended. I love fontina on pumpernickel. Enjoy!

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creamy tomato soup.
adapted from food + wine magazine. 

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ingredients
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoons olive or grapeseed oil
1 onion, diced (about 1.5 cups)
3 garlic cloves, smashed
3.5 cups fire roasted diced tomatoes (from 1 28 ounce can)
1.5 cups passata (uncooked tomato puree)*
1 cup vegetable broth
2/3 cup half and half
1 tablespoon coconut palm OR unrefined white sugar
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
sea salt and black pepper

ingredients
In a large, heavy bottomed pot, melt one tablespoon of butter and one tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. Add the diced onion and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about five minutes. Add the undrained tomatoes, passata, vegetable broth, sugar, crushed red pepper, oregano, celery seed, smoked paprika and season with about a teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Bring the soup to a boil over high heat, breaking up the tomatoes with the spoon/spatula. Reduce heat to moderate and simmer for 10 minutes.

Working in batches or using an immersion blender, puree soup until smooth. If using stand blender, transfer blended soup to a clean pot over low heat. Add half and half and season with additional salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

Serves 4 as a main dish, 8 as a starter.

*Please use organic ingredients wherever possible* 

NOTE: Passata is an uncooked tomato puree that is strained to have the seeds and skins removed. It originated in Italy and common in Europe. It differs from the tomato sauce or puree that you commonly find in U.S. grocery stores as it is uncooked and typically has nothing added to it, thus having a very fresh and light flavor. It is typically found in your grocery store’s tomato aisle, with specialty products, or in the Organic section. It is usually in a tall glass carafe or a box.

If you cannot find it, don’t despair! You can simply use an equivalent amount of whole/diced tomatoes, or tomato puree or sauce, being aware that the tomato puree or sauce will be much sweeter, due to the amount of sugar that is typically found in these products. The brand of passata I use is pictured above, and is labeled as ‘strained tomatoes’.

green lentil + vegetable soup.

The weather has finally dipped below 75 degrees, and thus it is officially soup season. Hooray! I really should just market this blog as a soup and stew blog. I could eat soup every day for the rest of my life and be a very, very happy girl. I decided to kick off fall and the start of soup season with a super versatile and easy one: green lentil soup. Lentils were my gateway legume, and for good reason: they are quick cooking, filling, and full of vitamins and nutrients. Truth time: Lentils will never win any beauty pageants. What this soup lacks in beauty, it makes up for in taste. It’s flavorful, warming, and so satisfying.

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If you haven’t already, I sweetly suggest you check out this mexican-inspired red lentil soup. If you love your soups with a kick, that one is for you!

This soup starts off with the classic trio: carrots, celery and onion. After those are softened, the tomatoes and spices are added along with the lentils and vegetable stock. Let everything simmer, give it a quick blitz with the immersion blender, and that’s it! Put on your coziest sweater, and curl up with a bowl and some mulled cider. Hello fall, it’s so nice that you’re back.

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green lentil + vegetable soup.

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ingredients
8 ounces (1 cup) of green lentils, rinsed
2 medium carrots, peeled and diced (about 1/3 cup)
2 celery stalks, halved and diced (about 1/3 cup)
1 small onion, diced (about 1/2 cup)
14 ounce can of diced tomatoes (no salt added)
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon coriander
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 bay leaf
4 cups of vegetable stock, plus additional 1/2 cup if needed
1 tablespoon grapeseed oil

directions
Heat a heavy bottomed soup pot over medium heat. Drizzle one tablespoon of grapeseed oil into the pot and heat until lightly shimmering.

Add onions, celery, and carrots to the pot and cook for 6-7 minutes, or until soft and translucent. Add sea salt, cumin, coriander, cayenne pepper, garlic powder, and black pepper and stir to coat the vegetables with the spices. Once coated, add the can of diced tomatoes (undrained), bay leaf, rinsed lentils, and 4 cups of vegetable stock. Stir to combine, and increase the heat to allow the soup to come to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to low and partly cover, allowing the soup to simmer for 30-45 minutes, or until the lentils are soft but not falling apart. Fish out the bay leaf.

Blend 1/4 of the soup with an immersion blender (or remove and blend in a stand blender) and stir together. Add in half cup of additional stock if needed to thin. Serve, topped with extra black pepper if desired.

Serves 4.

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible** 

mole-style turkey chili.

I love chili. It is one of my go to dishes for a meal that is easy, filling, inexpensive and oh so simple to make. Although I love a traditional chili recipe, and this amazing sweet potato turkey chili, I’m always looking for a new take on a beloved recipe. I came across this recipe for turkey chili, which included traditional mole ingredients such as cocoa powder and cinnamon. If you’ve never heard of mole, it is a very traditional Mexican sauce that can be prepared in tons of different ways. Moles can be yellow, green, orange, red and the classic dark red and brown sauces. They almost always start with chiles, maybe some sour ingredients like tomatillos, spices, nuts/seeds and/or dried fruit, thickeners like day old bread, and chocolate. If chocolate is used, it is added at the end of the cooking process, as moles typically cook for long periods of time.

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But this post is about chili, not mole! I call it “mole style” because of  the unsweetened cocoa powder and cinnamon that is added the recipe, along with chipotle chile in adobo sauce. Chipotles in adobo are super spicy, but delightfully smoky and best of all, a little goes a long way!

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I highly recommend this spin on a beloved, classic dish such as chili. Feel free to serve with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt and shavings of bittersweet chocolate atop the bowl. Trust me!

mole-style turkey chili.
adapted from myrecipes.com

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ingredients

1 pound lean ground turkey
1 tablespoon grapeseed oil
1/2 sweet onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 carrots, finely diced
1 14 oz. can pinto beans, drained and rinsed
1 14 oz. can tomatoes, diced or petite diced with juices
1/2 chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, diced (seeds removed if desired), plus 1 teaspoon of the sauce
2.5 teaspoons chili powder (NOT cayenne)
1.5 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 heaping tablespoon of unsweetened raw cocoa powder (I really love the Nativa Naturals cacao)
2 cups chicken broth
1 cup water
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped, for garnish
3 scallions, sliced, for garnish
tortilla chips, for serving

directions

Heat a heavy bottomed pot over medium heat and add 1/2 tablespoon oil, until slightly shimmering and hot. Add turkey and cook for 5 minutes, breaking apart as it cooks until cooked through. If desired, drain turkey in a colander and return to pan.

Add remaining 1/2 tablespoon oil to turkey and add onions, garlic, chili powder, cumin, oregano, salt and pepper and stir well to combine. Cook for 3 minutes and add carrots. Cook for additional 3-5 minutes, or until onion is translucent and soft and garlic is fragrant. Stir spices frequently, and allow them to bloom and become fragrant. Add a tablespoon or two of water and scrape gently with a wooden spoon if needed to release spices on the bottom of the pan.

Add tomatoes, chipotle chili and adobo sauce, chicken broth, water and cocoa powder and stir to combine. Increase heat and allow pot to come to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook for 25-30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in beans and cook for an additional 15 minutes.

Top with cilantro and scallions prior to serving. Serve with baked tortilla chips if desired.

Serves 6. Freezes beautifully!

**Please use organic ingredients wherever possible**